movies

Interview Rewind: "Wedding Palace" Co-Screenwriter Robert Gardner

Originally posted on Moniqueblog.net in 2013. 

Wedding Palacedirected by Christine Yoo and written by Robert Gardner and Derek Draper and starring Brian Tee, Hye-jeong Kang, Bobby Lee, Jean Yoon and Margaret Cho, is a film that has charm, humor, and tons of sweet likability. The film is also unique–even though the film is one that’s about Korean culture, the writers, Gardner and Draper, are both African-American. So how did this film come to be, and what type of research was done to get the film’s voice just right? I was able to discuss this with Gardner in an email interview. Check out his insight into the writing process and what his favorite film from the scene is. Also look below for a behind-the-scenes video about the making of the film. Wedding Palace is now available to home audiences.

Egypt and Morocco Ban "Exodus: Gods and Kings"

Exodus: Gods and Kings has had a rough road. Hundreds (probably thousands) of people rose up in arms over the inaccurate casting of the film, with the hashtag #BoycottExodusMovie. The film had a lousy opening weekend and has since fallen off the map domestically. Now, the film is facing even more heat from Egypt and Morocco.  Both have banned the film over it’s “historical inaccuracies.”

Sony News: Amy Pascal Rooted for Idris Elba as Next James Bond

There’s been a ton of junk that came out of the Sony hack, ranging from Kevin Hart being called a “whore,” Angelina Jolie described as a “spoiled brat” and, of course, what black films President Obama might like. However, out of all of hat stuff, there apparently was something positive that Sony Pictures Entertainment co-chair Amy Pascal discussed in her emails: Idris Elba as James Bond. The Daily Beast’s report leads me to think Pascal was adamant about this happening, at least to some degree.

Fantasy Casting: "Noah"

I’ve been on a tirade about Exodus: Gods and Kingsand if I’m being honest, I think I’ll always be upset about that movie. But what I’m not upset about is that the film brought in only $8.6 million its first day in the theaters. That’s exponentially less money than what the studio was expecting to make, particularly to recoup the $140 million it took to make. Thanks to tons of bad press from mainstream outlets such as CNN (and many more that would take up a paragraph to name), and the #BoycottExodus movement merging with the #BlackLivesMatter movement (leading to die-ins in theaters and protests outside of them), the movie’s imagery has certainly made people think. It would seem that people are beginning to wake up to the fact that white actors in what should be roles for people of color looks stupid.

Queer Coded: Thranduil ("The Hobbit" Franchise)

I’ve been thinking about Thranduil a lot. Most of my thinking has been about how I knew people would receive him, as shown by this article and lots of things on Tumblr and this Twitter page. Even I have talked about Thranduil in a slightly “fabulous” manner, describing him to my siblings and in a movie review as the Mariah Carey of The Hobbit. If you’ve seen The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, you may or may not have thought something along these lines as well. But the question is: Why did we think this? To break it down further, what in Thranduil’s characterization led a lot of people to assume that Thranduil was, to use the loaded term again, “fabulous”?